The Nutrition Bar with Major Proven Health Benefits

TLC Clinical Perspective*

Rita Ellithorpe, MD, Janel Meric, MD, Cyndee Ayson-Mitchell, MD, Navjot Kaur, ND, Linda Keil, RN, Priya Patel PA-C

Tustin Longevity Center, Tustin CA. in association with:
Robert Settineri, MS and John Hyatt, BS
Sierra Productions Research, Irvine, CA

Summary

Today’s consumer is increasingly aware of the part that nutrition plays in staying healthy. However, most find it difficult to fit a proper diet into a modern, fast-paced lifestyle. Many people turn to nutrition bars to fill this gap on-the-go, but the majority of bars on the market are overloaded with high-glycemic ingredients. Some even exceeding sugar and unhealthy fat levels of candy! They might furnish temporary energy but do not supply the broad-spectrum dietary components required to sustain an active routine. This paper examines the comprehensive nutrient profile of a remarkable nutrition bar called Drs’ Gr8 Bar that rises far above the rest: highly recommended by medical professionals and backed by scientific and medical research. 

Introduction

Like many people, your life is extremely busy. Consequently, you probably find yourself often eating on the run, sacrificing nourishment for the sake of time. This is a major reason nutrition bars are so popular today with people of all ages. However, while marketed as being healthy, many bars are just disguised high-carb, sugary snacks with a little added fiber. Sometimes they even contain substances detrimental to health, such as trans fats, artificial sweeteners, and genetically engineered (GMO) ingredients. The Best … Bar None Drs Gr8 Nutrition Bar— is a complete and convenient energy source for people on the go. Perhaps the best news of all is that it is both delicious AND good for you! Drs Gr8 Nutrition Bar comes in the tantalizing flavor of chocolate cacao and almond and is made from all-natural and organic ingredients. Imagine biting into a delectable bar with the smooth rich taste of coconut and chocolate and the satisfying crunch of almonds! Watching calories? You will appreciate that this low-carb, low-sugar excellent net carb bar won’t sabotage your weight management goals. This bar shuns the bad (like trans fats and GMOs) and embraces the good—like vegan-friendly protein.

Even though it is rich in fiber, it is also gluten-free. Perhaps among the most unique and impressive ingredients are a unique proprietary non-soy phospholipid, which nourishes your entire body, from the cell membrane to the brain. Drs Gr8 Bar… 8 Compelling Healthy Reasons Why Drs Gr8 Nutrition Bar is the only nutritional bar on the market today that is backed by research and validated clinical benefits. Here are 8 - Gr8 compelling healthy reasons why Drs Gr8 Nutrition Bar is endorsed by TLC medical professionals:

1. Helps maintain healthy blood values
2. Supports healthy digestion
3. Helps control hunger and appetite.
4. Provides sustained energy
5. Promotes healthy cell function
6. Supports brain health
7. Promotes healthy metabolism
8. Improves the quality of life

 

The Best Ingredients Make the Best Bar

Sunflower Lecithin- Phospholipids: Sunflower lecithin is a rich source of good fats (phospholipids) extracted from sunflower seeds. These phospholipids nourish many parts of the body, especially brain tissues. Primary phospholipids found in sunflower lecithin include choline, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine.

Unlike soy-derived lecithin, sunflower lecithin is extracted without the aid of chemicals, making it a more pure and natural product.

Exhaustive research shows that phospholipids benefit the body, starting with the cell membrane, without any side effects. Phospholipids have been proven to repair damaged cell membranes, increase mitochondrial function, improve mental clarity, increase energy and reduce fatigue. Since the cell membrane is responsible for the body’s basic health in all systems, the importance of these compounds cannot be underestimated.  

Drs' Gr8 Bar Research

A research study was conducted at Tustin Longevity Center with Rita Ellithorpe, MD as the Principal Investigator. The study entailed a direct comparison of a top-selling nutrition bar compared with the Drs's Gr8 nutrition bar. The parameters tested were: a response survey measuring hunger, energy, mental clarity, and recommendations. (Fig. 1)

Blood biomarkers of glucose and insulin were evaluated comparing the top seller with Drs' Gr8 nutrition bar. (Fig. 2)

The summary of the results of blood biomarkers is depicted in (Fig. 3.)

 Figure 1

 

Figure 2

 

Figure 3

 

 

Research suggests some of the reasons that nuts, such as almonds, have shown to benefit the heart. Nuts have shown to reduce inflammation in blood vessels. A data analysis of nearly 6000 participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) showed that consumption of nuts and seeds reduced levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and fibrinogen. In the prospective Nurses’ Health Study involving 987 diabetic women, there was found a direct connection between regular nut consumption and increased plasma levels of adiponectin, a protein that helps reduce inflammation and benefit blood vessel health. The studies show that there is a correlation between frequent consumption of nuts and reduced inflammation, as well as balanced serum lipid and glucose levels.

Organic Almond Butter: Almonds are among the nuts highest in protein and they taste wonderful, too! Nuts contain good fats that nourish the heart and circulatory system. They do not negatively affect blood glucose levels and promote healthy serum lipids. They are a source of fiber and many vital nutrients, including calcium.

Research suggests some of the reasons that nuts, such as almonds, have shown to benefit the heart. Nuts have shown to reduce inflammation in blood vessels. A data analysis of nearly 6000 participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) showed that consumption of nuts and seeds reduced levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and fibrinogen. In the prospective Nurses’ Health Study involving 987 diabetic women, there was found a direct connection between regular nut consumption and increased plasma levels of adiponectin, a protein that helps reduce inflammation and benefit blood vessel health. The studies show that there is a correlation between frequent consumption of nuts and reduced inflammation, as well as balanced serum lipid and glucose levels.

Pea Protein: Peas are naturally rich in both protein and the type of soluble fiber called pectin. These nutritional components quickly satisfy appetite to create a feeling of fullness.Pea fiber has been studied and found to support healthy blood values (especially concerning lipids and glucose). 

In 2012, a preclinical study on mice revealed that pea protein offers both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. In a clinical study involving overweight human subjects, pea flours balanced insulin response. This was explained by the fact that protein given with glucose will reduce plasma glucose in some type II diabetics, and when further accompanied by fiber pectin, those individuals will feel full and therefore reduce their caloric intake. The most remarkable conclusion of the study was that high dietary fiber rather than high dietary protein is the most important to persons wishing to lose weight.

 Non-GMO Tapioca Fiber: Tapioca fiber is beneficial for many reasons. The fiber is easily digestible, even for those people with sensitive digestive tracts. Both gluten-free and cholesterol-free, it helps maintain healthy cholesterol and blood sugar levels. It also helps promote regularity and both the good carbs and fiber in tapioca help keep you feeling fuller, longer.

Tapioca is a universally non-reactive food, as it is also nut-free and grain-free. It is easily digestible and is highly recommended as a source of calories and energy by those with bowel issues. Cassava pulp (tapioca fiber) might also be useful to reduce mercury load from food such as fish.

Chicory Root Fiber: Special carbohydrates in chicory root fiber (inulin and oligofructose) serve to feed and multiply the good Bifidobacteria in your digestive tract. Studies in human volunteers have shown that chicory root can increase the composition of this beneficial flora, greatly benefiting the entire system. It also exerts a positive influence on serum glucose levels, as an anti-inflammatory agent, and to balance lipid metabolism.

Chicory is rich in many nutrients, including anthocyanins (a type of antioxidant) as well as vitamins A and C, potassium, calcium, and phosphorus. It offers anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and immune-modulatory effects. Research shows it is an excellent source of compounds that nourish circulation, protect the liver and balance blood glucose and cholesterol levels.

Organic 100% Cacao Chocolate Chips: Dark chocolate is rich in polyphenols, antioxidants that benefit the entire cardiovascular system, especially the blood vessel walls. These nutrients also support healthy blood glucose levels. A diet that includes regular consumption of dark chocolate has been connected to low serum concentrations of the biomarker for inflammation called C-reactive protein. This has been noted in the NHANES, a study that correlated low inflammation with ingestion of beneficial compounds such as flavonols and procyanidins found in dark chocolate, it also promotes circulatory health by promoting the production of vasodilating factors, including nitric oxide (NO). In another study, the polyphenols in dark chocolate have shown to exert a positive influence on circulation and insulin sensitivity.

Organic Coconut Oil: Coconut oil is a rich source of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) that provide a quick source of energy for the body. These nutrients most notably exert a positive influence on the cardiovascular, digestive, nervous, and immune systems. Coconut oil offers antioxidants, anti-inflammatory effects, and is a great help to those seeking to shed unwanted pounds.

A diet high in coconut oil has shown to promote a healthy brain. Certain beneficial compounds and hormones in coconut may help prevent deterioration of its function. A ketogenic diet (high in fat and low in carbohydrates) has shown to reduce inflammation in brain tissues. Research shows coconut oil is a promising agent in reducing the risk of cardiovascular events through its properties that modulate lipid concentrations in the blood.  

Spinach: Rich in chlorophyll, folic acid, and many trace minerals, this renowned vegetable is revered for its abundant nutritive and health-promoting properties. Its dense nutritional profile supports a robust cardiovascular system and helps maintain healthy blood fat levels. Studies confirm that intake of spinach can benefit circulation and blood vessel health, as well as help, reduce inflammation in the body. If your eating patterns are sporadic or have nutrient gaps that need to be filled, look no further than Drs Gr8 Nutrition Bar. Satisfy your hunger and your longing for impeccable goodness today. Ask your doctor about how Drs Gr8 Nutrition Bar can improve your health and well-being.

Our mission is to help nourish a nutrient-deficient world!

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* Drs Gr8 bar was researched, developed, formulated and approved by TLC Doctors in association with Sierra Productions Research, Irvine. CA.

 

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